The Daily Brew

Saturday, August 03, 2002:


Common Sense // 3:21 PM

______________________

This quote by Tim Hutchinson's evangelical Christian sister-in-law, Betty Sue Hutchinson, made my day:

"It makes me mad," Betty Sue Hutchinson said. "Half the world votes for who they like, not for principles. My Aunt Sue is a Republican, and she always voted for Bill Clinton no matter what I said, because she'd met him and she just liked him."

Common Sense // 3:20 PM

______________________


Common Sense // 11:06 AM

______________________

How many of you have secretly wished for this kind of moment?

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and a childhood acquaintance were recalling youthful pastimes such as "pluffer," shooting chinaberries at each other through a tube of cane. But the laughter was interrupted when Abigail Jordan, a retired educator and local activist, eyed Thomas.

There was something in the portrait of Thomas and his friends, yukking it up, enjoying themselves, that compelled Jordan to move toward the group, close enough, as she would later say, "to be kissed" by Lester Johnson. She stood before the assembled, stared and then abruptly said: "I just wanted to see what a group of Uncle Toms look like." Then she walked away.

To call someone an Uncle Tom is among the most searing insults a black American can hurl at a member of his own race, a synonym for sellout, someone subservient to whites at the expense of his own people. That the lone African American on the Supreme Court would provoke such a cutting slur should be astounding.

In what other corner of America does someone of such achievement face withering contempt from people who look like him and grew up like him? "I hope his wife feeds him lots of eggs and butter and he dies early, like many black men do, of heart disease," Julianne Malveaux, the liberal commentator, once cracked on a talk show.

Thomas likes to say the cuts don't bleed, but his anger, his resentment, his hurt are hard to mask. If Thomas is unbothered by the harsh judgment of him, why does he spend so much time talking about it? The depiction of himself as a victim, a man under unfair siege, is a staple of Thomas's speeches. "It would affect anybody if you got criticism all your life," suggests Abraham Famble, a childhood friend who visits Thomas at his Fairfax home every summer. "I think he would clearly love his relationship with the black community to be different . . . There is a wistfulness there. You can't be outside of the fold and not feel it," she says, speaking as an unpredictable black voice herself. "He is the lowest of the low in sort of official blackdom. It's unfair, and it's got to hurt."

This kind of treatment is wrong. No mattter what, Thomas should be treated with basic human decency. At the same time, it isn't totally unfair; Thomas created and continues to create his own problems. Were he simply to start ruling like an independent judge with a lifetime appointment, instead of the go-to reactionary, I suspect people's opinion of Thomas could be changed. But as long as he continues to act like the "got mine, up yours" buffoon who put Usurper boy in the White House, I can't really say I'm crying for him if the black community doesn't want to treat him like their best buddy.

Common Sense // 11:04 AM

______________________

Friday, August 02, 2002:

As soon as MWO gives me top billing, I leave on vacation. Figures. See ya'll about the middle of August.

Before I go, I had a few random thoughts.

Does Bush have a choice but to go after Saddam? He can't very well back down now, after all of his "axis of evil" "change of regeime" blather, can he? Hasn't he made an ultimatum that means, well, either he goes to war, or he single handedly destroys the credibility of a threat by the United States government? So isn't he screwed either way? If he doesn't attack, he is just like his dad who let Saddam get away in the first place, only worse, because of all of Junior's bellicose rhetoric? But if he does attack, when Saddam responds by blowing up well heads in Kuwait and Saudi Arabia, oil will go to $60 a barrel and the Dow will go below 6,000. Doesn't that mean either way, Bush is done, as in stick a fork in him?

On a related note, isn't it a given that if Bush attacks Saddam, Saddam will attack Isreal? Except Isreal no longer has a leader who is cool enough to sit still until the US pummels Saddam, like they did in 1991. Now they have Sharon. Who would, what? Nuke Baghdad? As Biden et al pose and posture, I think they ought to consider that more than a "simple invasion" of Iraq might be at stake here. They might just be authorizing World War 3.

Common Sense // 10:53 PM

______________________

Tuesday, July 30, 2002:

My prayers have been answered!

Media whores online gave me a permenant link!

let the flood gates of massivehits open!

Common Sense // 9:42 PM

______________________

Looks like Kerry is throwing his hat in the VP ring, and Gore is telling the New Democrats to Go Fuckthemselves:

Kerry and Daschle backed away from endorsing Lieberman's critique, while Gore spokesman Jano Cabrera issued this rebuttal to New Democrat criticism of the former vice president. "They have a theory in search of facts," he said. "The fact is that Al Gore's 2000 message won more votes than any other Democratic candidate in the entire history of this country."
Common Sense // 11:32 AM

______________________

Monday, July 29, 2002:

Its official. Lieberman is off the ticket. "The people versus the powerful unfortunately left that track and gave a different message, which may have been caused by the pressure that the Nader campaign was giving us," Mr. Lieberman said, referring to Ralph Nader, the Green Party candidate. "But I think it was not the New Democratic approach."

will it be Kerry, or Edwards?
Common Sense // 7:26 PM

______________________

These guys have just raised the bar on "cool" to never before seen heights.


Common Sense // 3:02 PM

______________________

Sunday, July 28, 2002:

Ever wonder if the industry realized Fox News was crap?

"Coverage stemming from the events of Sept. 11 and its aftermath not surprisingly dominated nominations for the 23rd annual News and Documentary Emmy Awards announced Monday, with PBS amassing the most bids in a year that saw a record number of submissions. PBS leads the tally, with 41 nods. CBS receives 26; ABC, 19. Fox News Channel is shut out.
Common Sense // 9:17 PM

______________________


This site is powered by Blogger because Blogger rocks!









Visit the main page and read email policy at http://www.thedailybrew.com email us at brew@thedailybrew.com

Archives